Wednesday, 25 July 2018

2 BY TED LEWIS - PART TWO

A couple from one of the Godfathers of British Noir - Ted Lewis and his Jack Carter series.






















I featured a couple of his other books a few years ago - 2 BY TED LEWIS


Lewis penned nine books in his lifetime, died young - early 40s and is the subject of  Nick Triplow's painstakingly researched - Getting Carter. Everyone must have at least heard of the classic film Get Carter which was based on Lewis' novel Jack's Return Home


Looking forward to seeing how Carter gets on in these next two installments....



Jack Carter and the Law (1974)

The author of Get Carter returns to his greatest invention, a smooth-operating hardcase named Jack Carter, who is about to burn a city down in order to silence an informant

London. The late 1960s. It's Christmastime and Jack Carter is the top man in a crime syndicate headed by two brothers, Gerald and Les Fletcher. He's also a worried man. The fact that he's sleeping with Gerald's wife, Audrey, and that they plan on someday running away together with a lot of the brothers' money, doesn't have Jack concerned. Instead it's an informant - one of his own men - that has him losing sleep. The grass has enough knowledge about the firm to not only bring down Gerald and Les but Jack as well. Jack doesn't like his name in the mouth of that sort.

In Jack Carter's Law Ted Lewis returned to the character that launched his career and once again delivered a hardboiled masterpiece. Jack Carter is the ideal tour guide to a bygone London underworld. In his quest to dismantle the opposition, he peels back the veneer of English society and offers a hard look at a gritty world of pool halls, strip clubs and the red lights of Soho nightlife.

Jack Carter and the Mafia Pigeon (1977)


Jack Carter is not thrilled when his frustratingly unprofessional employers - London mob kingpins Gerald and Les Fletcher - force him to take a vacation. Jack doesn't like leaving the business in other people's hands, but the company villa in Spain promises sunshine and some time to plot his next move. Jack soon finds he is on anything but a vacation. The villa is already inhabited by a cowardly house steward and a knuckle-dragging American gangster. Jack has apparently been sent to protect the American, who has turned informant. There are few things that Jack Carter hates more than surprises. Informants being chief among them.

10 comments:

  1. These sound really interesting, Col. I've heard of Lewis' work, but haven't read it (should have - it was that influential - but just haven't). I'm glad you're calling attention to it here, and I hope you'll like it.

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    1. Margot, there's so many great authors out there - present day and past that it's unsurprising Lewis may have slipped past your reading radar. I'll let you know how I go.

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  2. Awful confession: I've never read anything by Lewis. I haven't even seen the movie(s). *hangs head in shame*

    You make me realize I really should get my act together and dig out the first book and the movie . . .

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    1. I'm a tad surprised that you haven't seen the film at least, but it's never too late. I read first book in his Carter series and something else by him a while back but nothing recently. I'm fairly sure his work was getting picked up by someone and being republished as ebooks, but I can only really see the Carter series available over on Amazon

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  3. I have seen Get Carter, and have the novel, but haven't read it yet. I will decide whether to read more after that.

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  4. I don't think I even knew Get Carter was based on a novel. With its legendary status I would be tempted to read the first book some time and see how I get on.

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    1. I think you would enjoy the series opener, Moira.

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  5. Col – I thought it would be awkward fessing up to never reading JACK’S RETURN HOME, but seems I am in good company. I have seen the movie several times – Great Movie. Guess it is time to open the book. GETTING CARTER also sounds good. Thanks.

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    1. Elgin, it's never too late to address that oversight!

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